Transportation

Because being there is what's most important, WPC's Center for Transportation researches and analyzes the best practices for relieving traffic congestion by recapturing a vision of a system based on freedom of movement.

Transportation Blog

Update: Did top King County officials cry wolf by promoting bus-service cuts?

June 9, 2014 in Blog

The Seattle Times reports today that top King County leaders may have been “crying wolf” earlier this year when they threatened a 16% cut in bus services unless voters agreed to accept increases in regressive sales and car taxes to direct more money to Metro Transit.

King County Councilmember Dembowski's plan would preserve most Metro bus service without regressive tax increases

June 9, 2014 in Blog

Soon after the people of King County defeated Proposition 1 , King County Executive Dow Constantine’s proposal to increase regressive sales and car taxes to avoid his bus-cuts plan, Executive Dow Constantine said “There are no other options but to cut [bus] service.”

Four reasons Seattle’s plan to save bus service could be worse than Proposition 1 for Seattleites

June 3, 2014 in Blog

On April 22nd, voters in King County overwhelmingly rejected Proposition 1, County leaders’ proposal to increase regressive car tab fees and sales taxes to collect more money for roads and transit. After the vote, county officials say they will move ahead with their plan to impose deep cuts to bus service in communities across the county.

Seattle City Councilmembers announce another tax plan to bolster Metro’s budget

May 19, 2014 in Blog

According to The Seattle Times, Seattle City Councilmembers Kshama Sawant and Nick Licata want to impose three tax increases to maintain Metro bus service in Seattle: a new tax on employers, higher parking taxes, and a hefty car tab fee.

New tax proposal to maintain bus service in Seattle; a timeline of events

May 15, 2014 in Blog

On April 22nd, voters in King County overwhelmingly rejected Proposition 1, a ballot measure to increase regressive car fees and sales taxes to provide more money for existing levels of public transit.  The special election cost about $1.8 million.  The measure’s defeat has sparked a crisis in the County’s management of Metro bus services.

Cities in King County may target drivers to pay for bus service under new plan

May 12, 2014 in Blog

At a press conference today, King County Executive Dow Constantine announced a plan to allow cities or groups of cities to purchase bus service to avoid service cuts.

Seattle Times Editorial urges look at tribal gas tax agreements

May 5, 2014 in Blog

Last week, The Seattle Times editorial board suggested the state Supreme Court should look into gas tax diversion. According to their editorial, former State Auditor Brian Sonntag looked at tribal agreements for fuel tax refunds he says the tribes aren’t eligible for. At tribal gas pumps, gas taxes are paid by the wholesaler, not the tribe.

King County leaders should call a timeout on bus cuts

April 29, 2014 in Blog

As King County officials come to terms with voters’ rejection of Proposition 1’s regressive tax increases, they are moving ahead with their earlier threats to cut bus services in neighborhoods across the county.  Less than a week after the election, County Executive Dow Constantine submitted his plans to impose service cuts.

King County leaders want to cut bus service, but that is not what people voted for when they defeated Proposition 1.

Yes or No on King County’s Proposition 1, the public does not want bus cuts

April 22, 2014 in Blog

For several months now, King County Executive Dow Constantine, Councilmember Larry Phillips and other county leaders have told the public they will cut neighborhood bus routes if they do not receive more revenue from regressive taxes. King County officials say that without the new regressive taxes, they plan to cut 550,000 hours of bus service in many neighborhoods. Their planned cuts would fall hardest in many low-income neighborhoods across the county.

Labor dispute may cost state $17 million; the earliest the tunneling machine could be fixed is March 2015

April 22, 2014 in Blog

According to Crosscut, the state may be on the hook for $17.6 million due to the labor dispute  that shut the tunnel project down for about a month. Last year, unions argued over four dirt hauling jobs that resulted in picket lines even though the Project Labor Agreement assured there would be no labor unrest.