Washington Policy Blog

WPC joins amicus defending people's right to enact fiscal restraints on lawmakers

August 3, 2015 in Blog

Washington Policy Center (WPC) is a strong defender of the people's right of initiative as well as their power to enact fiscal restraints on lawmakers to help promote sustainable budgeting. This is why we are happy to sign on to the amicus brief in the case of Kerr v. Hickenlooper currently before the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals for reconsideration at the direction of the U.S. Supreme Court. 

A disturbing example of union hypocrisy, intimidation and media control

July 31, 2015 in Blog

In the midst of organized labor’s demands for a $15 minimum wage for all workers comes the revelation that they do not pay this so-called “living” wage to their employees.

The Washington Times reports that as big labor bosses are boasting of their $15 minimum wage successes at the AFL-CIO’s annual summer meeting, at least one usher working the event told the reporter she did not earn $15 per hour.

Attorney General says State Superintendent Dorn has gone astray with his plan to shut down government

July 31, 2015 in Blog

Today the state Attorney General filed the state’s answer to Superintendent Randy Dorn’s brief to the state Supreme Court in the McCleary case, adding to the post-legislative-session reports to the Court about school funding. The AG sharply criticizes the Superintendent’s plan to shut down government, pointing out Dorn’s plan would cause children to go hungry:

The state of Ben Franklin Transit (BFT): Facts, figures and the 5:00 news live shot

July 31, 2015 in Blog

This week, Washington Policy Center released its latest Key Facts analysis of Ben Franklin Transit (BFT). BFT is the transit agency that serves the Tri-Cities (Richland-Kennewick-Pasco) region.

Our in-depth analysis shows total ridership has dropped 25% over the past five years. And the ridership drop is across all modes.

Is Initiative 1366 a constitutional amendment?

July 31, 2015 in Blog

Initiative 1366, the "Taxpayer Protection Act," has qualified for the November ballot. Here is the official ballot title and summary for I-1366: 

Michigan court ruling is another victory against forced unionism

July 30, 2015 in Blog

Yesterday the Michigan Supreme Court upheld that state’s new right-to-work law with its ruling that state workers are subject to the law.  This means public employees are subject to the same protections from forced unionism as those in private industries.

Medical Homes are not as Effective as Obamacare Supporters Hoped

July 29, 2015 in Blog

One of the main goals of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), or Obamacare, is to decrease rising health care costs. The ACA allocated $10 billion to establish the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, a government organization charged with centrally planning health care delivery.

Part 2: Labor bosses think unions will lose landmark right-to-work case…and admit it could be a good thing

July 29, 2015 in Blog

Last week Greg Devereux, Executive Director of the Washington Federation of State Employees (WFSE), revealed he, and other union executives, believe unions will likely lose the Freidichs v California case before the U.S. Supreme Court.

The loss would render forced unionism for public employees illegal; individual workers would have the right to decide for themselves whether to join a union and pay union dues.

Part 1: Labor bosses think unions will lose landmark right-to-work case…and admit it could be a good thing

July 29, 2015 in Blog

Greg Devereux, Executive Director of the Washington Federation of State Employees (WFSE), recently revealed he, and other union executives, believe the era of forced unionism for public sector workers is coming to an end.  And surprisingly, he doesn’t think it will be the union-crippling catastrophe unions have long-claimed.

What a $15 wage will really mean for New York’s fast food workers

July 23, 2015 in Blog

As fast food employers in the state of New York brace for that state’s impending $15 wage mandate, one business owner succinctly explained what the high wage will mean for her business and her employees:

It really is going to come to less people.  What I envision is cutting labor, hiring less people, having less people per shift.”

$15 minimum wage is encouraging a part-time work force

July 23, 2015 in Blog

On the heels of Los Angeles becoming the latest city to pass a $15 minimum wage law and the state of New York moving closer to a mandate requiring a $15 wage for fast food workers, Fox News reports

Tacoma mother explains her charter school choice

July 21, 2015 in Blog

In this thirty-second News Tribune video, Tacoma mother Roquesia Williams calmly explains why she sought a charter school for her children, Gesiah, age 6, Geharii, age 11, Genai, age 14:

 

Lawmakers, in strong response to McCleary ruling, vote historic levels of funding for public schools

July 20, 2015 in Blog

In a recent Facebook post, education policy leader Rep. Chad Magendanz (R-Issaquah) noted that state supreme court justices may soon decide to impose a punishment on him and fellow lawmakers for failing to fund public schools.  He asks readers, “What do you feel might be appropriate sanctions for the Court to impose at this point?”

Seattle housing task force wants to raise taxes to make neighborhoods more crowded

July 15, 2015 in Blog

Danny Westneat’s Seattle Times column on phasing out single-family housing in Seattle drew over 250 comments within the first three hours of being posted online. By the next day, readers had logged over 700 more. Why is a column about housing in Seattle drawing such a large response? A proposal by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray’s housing task force suggests officials may want to make sweeping changes to many of Seattle’s neighborhoods.