WA State of Emergency Order 0 Days : 0 Hours : 0 Minutes : 0 Seconds Excluding elected representatives is wrong. WA needs reform.

LATEST BLOGS

Congress holds hearing on emergency powers reform
By JASON MERCIER  | 
May 17, 2022

With Washington state now approaching 808 straight days of governance under the Governor’s emergency orders, lawmakers in the other Washington (DC) are looking at reforms to the President’s emergency powers. The arguments made at today’s congressional hearing for legislative oversight of emergency powers also apply to the need for state reforms. As noted by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) . . . 

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Sending hopeful messages about state's long-term-care law doesn’t make it a good deal; exemptions continue
By ELIZABETH HOVDE  | 
May 17, 2022

Administrators of Washington state’s long-term-care law are hitting news outlets and plying health care writers with messages of hope about a social program they say will provide “peace of mind,” even though it does nothing of the sort. 

The government website selling the WA Cares program says, “By contributing a small amount from each paycheck while we’re working, we can all pay for long-term care when we need it.” But that’s far from the case. Washingtonians who move out of state after retirement and have long-term-care needs won’t benefit from the program, regardless of how much of their money has gone toward the WA Cares Fund. Neither will workers who didn’t pay into the fund 10 or more years without a five-year break. Failing to need enough assisted care — help with three or more activities of daily living — also rules you out. 

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Raiding protected reserve account (BSA) leads to confusion
By JASON MERCIER  | 
May 13, 2022

A recent report by Pew Charitable Trusts on state budget reserve levels has sparked confusion in Washington about our rankings for protected and unrestricted reserves. Pew starts the report by looking at the protected “rainy day accounts” and says this about Washington for 2021: “Washington was the only state to end the budget year with a negative rainy day fund balance after draining its savings of $1.7 billion; however, the state is projected to at least partially replenish its savings over the next several fiscal years.” Based on some of the social media comments about this, it looks like some folks didn’t read the entire Pew report to see the analysis of unrestricted reserves and believed Washington had no reserves.

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