Transportation

Because being there is what's most important, WPC's Center for Transportation researches and analyzes the best practices for relieving traffic congestion by recapturing a vision of a system based on freedom of movement.

Transportation Blog

Oregon lawmakers work to repeal costly low carbon fuel standard rules, while in Washington, the fight over imposing similar rules stalls passage of key transportation bill

June 24, 2015 in Blog

Oregon Governor Kate Brown is working with a bi-partisan group of lawmakers to repeal the state’s low carbon fuel standard regulations (LCFS) as part of passing a broad congestion-relief transportation package.  The agreement shows how a governor and lawmakers of both parties can come together to pass important legislation that serves the people of their state.  Unfortunately, things are working differently in Washington.

Talks on state transportation package shut down; pitting new taxes against funding for public projects

June 20, 2015 in Blog

According to House Transportation Committee Chair Judy Clibborn (D-Mercer Island), Democratic leaders have decided to halt work on a transportation package until state leaders agree on a state operating budget.  House leaders say they want to work on passing a new capital gains income tax, despite receiving $3.2 billion in new revenue under current tax rates.

Governor Inslee signs $7.6 billion transportation budget; no pilot program for new per-mile tax

June 12, 2015 in Blog

Yesterday, Governor Inslee signed a two-year transportation budget into law. The $7.6 billion plan includes about $5 billion for the Washington State Department of Transportation over the next two years, $430 million for the Washington State Patrol, and dedicates about $1.5 billion to pay off Nickel and TPA bonds. The budget for the 2015-2017 biennium also funds other transportation-related offices and departments, like the Department of Licensing.

Drivers in Washington are hitting the road; travel up five percent over last year

June 4, 2015 in Blog

According to new information provided by the Federal Highway Administration, driving across the United States is on the rise. According to the latest report, nationwide vehicle miles traveled (the amount people drive) in the first three months of the year is up 3.9% compared to last year. The Western region of the United States saw a 5.3% year-over-year uptick in road travel for March alone.

Rideshares now under statewide framework – Senate Bill 5550 signed by Governor Inslee

May 22, 2015 in Blog

Things will get a bit easier for rideshare drivers and their customers under a bill Governor Inslee signed into law last week. Senate Bill 5550, originally sponsored by Senators Cyrus Habib and Joe Fain, provides a statewide structure of insurance requirements for rideshare companies to allow rideshare expansion across the state. WPC provided analysis on the bill back in February.

Sound Transit could build more light rail without raising regressive taxes

May 6, 2015 in Blog

Sound Transit’s demands for new taxing authority have become a sticking point in the debate in the legislature over a new transportation package.  Sound Transit officials want an estimated $15 billion in new taxing authority.  They want a 0.5% increase in Sound Transit’s sales tax authority, to a total of 1.4% (which would bring the total sales tax rate in Seattle to 10.1%), a 0.8% increase in the Motor Vehicle Excise Tax authority to a total of 1.1%, and a property tax increase of .25 per $1,000 of assessed value ($100/year on a $400,000 house).

Day one of the special session: Where do the state House and Senate differ on a transportation package?

April 29, 2015 in Blog

Over the past three years, state lawmakers have sparred over a transportation package that would raise the gas tax and other driver-related fees to build and maintain roads and highways, spend more on transit and fund the Washington State Patrol. In 2013, the state House passed a transportation package that included the controversial Columbia River Crossing project and would have directed state money to local transit operations. The Senate decided against voting on the proposal.

Building light rail is not an effective way to reduce traffic congestion

April 17, 2015 in Blog

Three elected officials serving on Sound Transit’s Board recently penned an editorial in The Seattle Times calling for a $15 billion increase in regressive taxes to build more light rail. Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland, Everett City Councilmember Paul Roberts and Redmond Mayor John Marchione argue that building light rail is an effective way to reduce carbon emissions and improve mobility.

Insider Project Labor Agreements likely to inflate construction costs on Seattle public projects

April 10, 2015 in Blog

Earlier this year the Seattle City Council passed Ordinance 124690, forcing the use of costly Project Labor Agreements (PLAs) and “Priority Hire” on public projects of $5 million or more. The new rule hurts the public interest because it inflates project costs; studies show PLAs artificially boost project costs by 12% to 18%. PLAs eliminate competitive bidding, pushing labor costs higher than normal market wages.

Building more light rail is not an effective way to reduce CO2 emissions

April 8, 2015 in Blog

Three elected officials serving on Sound Transit’s Board recently penned an editorial in The Seattle Times calling for a $15 billion increase in regressive taxes to build more light rail. Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland, Everett City Councilmember Paul Roberts and Redmond Mayor John Marchione argue that building light rail is an effective way to reduce carbon emissions and improve mobility.