Property Rights

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King County's Critical Areas Package: A Heavy-Handed Approach to Growth Management

September 15, 2004 in Publications

In March 2004, King County Executive Ron Sims proposed a series of new ordinances that, if enacted, would become some of the most restrictive regulations on the use of private property in the United States. Loosely referred to as the Critical Areas Package (CAP), these proposals have already received nationwide attention and have become the subject of heated controversy between rural landowners on one hand and county government and environmentalists on the other.

Proposed King County Regulations Compromise Rural Landowners' Rights

in Press releases

A new Policy Note from Washington Policy Center, written by William R. Maurer and Russ Brooks, addresses the negative impact that proposed Growth Management rules would have on rural landowners' property rights in King County.

In March 2004, King County Executive Ron Sims proposed a series of new ordinances that, if enacted, would become some of the most restrictive regulations on the use of private property in the United States.

Property Tax Limitation in Washington State

August 14, 2003 in Publications

In recent years Washington voters have approved three popular measures to ease the growth of the property tax burden government places on citizens. Each measure set progressively more stringent limitations on how much state and local elected officials could increase the basic property tax each year. The relatively easy passage of these measures indicates public support for limiting property taxes increases has remained stable over time.

Smart Growth and Housing Affordability: Evidence from Washington State

April 13, 2003 in Publications

Growth management has come to the forefront of public-policy debate at the state and local level. Concerned about the effects of both population and economic growth on their environment, citizens and their elected officials are struggling for ways to identify and mitigate the problems associated with new homes and the demand for shopping malls and office development that inevitably follows. New building growth, which usually occurs on the urban periphery, has laid the political foundation for a growing movement to restrict and further control the pace and pattern of land development. Many growth-management advocates argue that state and local land-use planning should actively shape the built environment for local citizens through zoning and various forms of development control.