Health Care

WPC's Center for Health Care develops patient-centered solutions to reduce costs and improve the availability and quality of health care for businesses and individuals, providing the only detailed, independent critique of health care issues available in the Northwest.

What's New

Federal Health Care Reform: A Two-Year Report Card

March 15, 2012 in In the News
Cascade Policy Institute
Source: 
Cascade Policy Institute
Date: 
Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Federal health care reform: Two-year report card

March 12, 2012 in In the News
Kitsap Peninsula Business Journal
Source: 
Kitsap Peninsula Business Journal
Date: 
Monday, March 12, 2012

Oregon Will Tax Health Plans to Fund Exchange

March 7, 2012 in In the News
Heartlander Magazine
Source: 
Heartlander Magazine
Date: 
Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Federal Health Care Reform: Two-year Report Card

March 6, 2012 in Publications

Major health care reform (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) became law two years ago. The legislation passed with only Democratic votes and totaled a massive 2,700 pages. The Medicare and Medicaid programs, by contrast, were enacted in 1965 with broad support from both parties and totaled only 137 pages. Although the 2010 PPACA will not be fully implemented until 2018, we know much more about it today than was apparent two years ago.

Drug Take-Back Mandate Would Do Little for the Environment

March 2, 2012 in In the News
National Center for Policy Analysis
Source: 
National Center for Policy Analysis
Date: 
Thursday, March 1, 2012

House vaults fiscal hurdle

February 17, 2012 in In the News
Spokesman-Review (Spokane)
Source: 
Spokesman-Review (Spokane)
Date: 
Friday, February 17, 2012

Solutions to Our Health Care Crisis

February 17, 2012 in Publications

The Spokane Journal of Business published this column on February 16, 2012.

The fundamental problem with the health care system in this country is its ever-rising cost. We spend 17% of our gross domestic product, or nearly $2.5 trillion, on health care each year. Most policy proposals attempt to control these expenses by imposing more top-down regulations, “better” medicine, and ultimately, a government-managed system.