Environment

WPC's Center for the Environment brings balance to the environmental debate by promoting the idea that human progress and prosperity work in a free economy to protect the environment.

What's New

Ericksen worries Inslee’s cap-and-trade push will be costly for families, employers

April 29, 2014 in In the News
Washington State Senate Republican Caucus
Source: 
Washington State Senate Republican Caucus
Date: 
Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Greens Worry the Middle Class Is Shrinking, but Not Fast Enough

April 28, 2014 in Blog

"Already, according to the Global Footprint Network, if everyone were to suddenly consume as Americans do, we would need four more planets to provide the resources and absorb the wastes. Technological improvements alone will not change this; we need to consume less."
- John de Graaf,
Bellingham Herald.

On Earth Day, Seattle Prioritizes Political Results Over Environmental Effectiveness

April 22, 2014 in Blog

Today is Earth Day and Crosscut has our piece highlighting the free-market approach to environmental policy. You can also hear my short interview on KUOW about the conservative approach to environmental policy.

Washington Policy Center's Todd Myers on truths behind "Eco Fads" and Earth Day

April 22, 2014 in In the News
KIRO Radio
Source: 
KIRO Radio
Date: 
Sunday, April 20, 2014

The Conservative Take On Environmentalism

April 21, 2014 in In the News
KUOW.org
Source: 
KUOW.org
Date: 
Monday, April 21, 2014

An Earth Day Agenda Conservatives Can Be Proud Of

April 21, 2014 in Publications

This Opinion/Editorial was featured on Crosscut.com on April 22, 2014. 

Earth Day provides clear evidence of how strange the environmental debate is these days.

Left-wing environmentalists, living in cities where concrete has largely replaced nature, will brag about their environmental successes while claiming the planet is doomed.

Gov. Inslee's Three Reasons to Support Cap-and-Trade: Politics, Politics and Politics

April 4, 2014 in Blog

Earlier this week, Governor Inslee, speaking at the University of Washington, explained his support for imposing a cap-and-trade system in Washington state to reduce carbon emissions.

Cap-and-trade, the system used by Europeans and others as part of the Kyoto Protocol, has two key elements. First, it sets a total cap on the amount of carbon emissions allowed, typically over the course of a year, by covered entities in the state. Second, covered entities are allowed to buy and trade permits to emit carbon.