Education

WPC's Center for Education conducts objective research and makes practical policy recommendations to improve Washington State's ability to carry out its paramount duty to educate every child within its borders.

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An Option for Learning: An Assessment of Student Achievement in Charter Public Schools

January 17, 2011 in Publications

Washington’s Charter School Ban

In 2004, Democrats and Republicans joined together to pass HB 2295, the Washington Charter Schools Act, which was signed into law by Governor Gary Locke in March.  Union executives strongly oppose charter schools, and Washington’s powerful teachers union, the WEA, launched Referendum 55 to repeal the new law.  The referendum passed, thus reinstating the charter school ban.  Today it is illegal to operate a charter public school in Washington state.

An Option for Learning: An Assessment of Student Achievement in Charter Public Schools

January 17, 2011 in Publications

Introduction

Since the 1930s, traditional public schools have been centrally run from the top down by state legislatures, school district administrators and, starting in the late 1960s, by collective bargaining agreements negotiated by powerful unions.  In addition, administrators in traditional public schools have never been held directly accountable for student performance.  Public schools that fail to educate students adequately often remain open and unchanged year after year.

Key Facts about Pasco Public Schools

January 13, 2011 in Publications

New research released by Washington Policy Center, a non-partisan public policy research think tank based in Seattle, provides key facts for the Pasco School District. Education budgets in Washington State are at historic highs, reaching $10,200 per student statewide.  Average teacher pay with benefits in Pasco is $73,962 for a ten-month work year.  Fifty three Pasco public school employees receive more than $100,000 a year.

Key Facts about Seattle Public Schools

January 11, 2011 in Publications

New research released by Washington Policy Center, an independent, non-partisan research organization based in Seattle, provides key facts about the Seattle School District.  Education spending in Washington state is at historic highs, averaging $10,200 per student statewide.  Average teacher pay in Seattle is $70,850 for a ten-month work year.  163 Seattle public school employees receive more than $100,000 a year.  The Seattle teachers’ union receives $3.2 million in education funding each year in the form of mandatory member dues.

Will Governor Gregoire's budget transform school finance?

December 12, 2010 in Blog

This week,  Governor Gregoire will release her proposed 2011-13 budget.  Will her budget incorporate the ideas offered by last summer’s Transforming Washington’s Budget Committee, or not? 

Why Superintendent Randy Dorn will continue to fail

December 6, 2010 in Blog

In his op-ed in The Seattle Times recently, Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn says he wants to “redouble our efforts to educate our children.”  Imagine my excitement as I eagerly began to read about the bold and innovative ideas Superintendent Dorn has for improving student learning in Washington schools - and imagine my growing disappointment as I discovered he wants to continue the same tired, worn-out bromides of the past:  spend more money and lower acade

2011 Education Breakfast

November 29, 2010 in Events
Date: 
Thursday, January 20th, 2011
Time: 
7:30 am - 9:00 am
Place: 
Seattle Westin
1900 5th Ave.
Seattle, WA

What We Can Learn from Baltimore City Schools, Featuring Baltimore City Public Schools C.E.O. Andrés A. Alonso

Put the focus on classroom

November 28, 2010 in In the News
Spokesman Review (Spokane)
Source: 
Spokesman Review (Spokane)
Date: 
Sunday, November 28, 2010

Bill Gates, Arne Duncan and Joel Klein criticize the way we pay teachers

November 27, 2010 in Blog

Last week Bill Gates and Arne Duncan, Obama's Secretary of Education, spoke in favor of re-examining the extra bump in salary states give to teachers who hold a masters degree.  This bump amounts to $11,000 per teacher in Washington, totaling $330 million.